Tag Archives: vintage photograph

Contemplating Life, with an Orangutang

 

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Filed under 1900s, 1910s, 1920s, Photograph

Bradford Bows

 

Spring has finally sprung here on the western side of Virginia, with the weather warming slightly and flowers beginning to bloom.  There’s one tree in particular that is extremely lovely this time of year, and which can be found all throughout Roanoke: the Bradford Pear.

bradford flower

Bradford Pear flowers at my parents’ house.

The young girl in today’s photograph sort of reminds me of a Bradford Pear tree, not only because of the large white bow placed on the side of her head, but also in the intricate white dress she dons (I always think of spring as crisp and white, not sure why-fresh beginnings, maybe?)

pinterest

 

Nothing against her fashion sense, but I would be so worried about crushing this beautifully made bow, and probably even more worried that the wind would make it take flight, as it doesn’t look too securely pinned on the right side of her head (left of the image).  It loosely cups her curls as not to crush them.

Besides her Bradford Pear inspired bow, there’s so much visually going on in this photo.  My eyes are immediately drawn to her facial expression (after the bow, of course).  Her large eyes hint at innocence, and her small smile is alluring, yet demure.  The tilt of her head illustrates her femininity, along with the soft curls underneath her bow.  After her face, the eye is drawn to the dotted pattern on the neckline of her dress, in addition to the flowered lace covering her shoulders, both intensifying her femininity.  The poof in her sleeve suggests either a tapering to a tight fitted arm, starting around the elbow, or short three-quarter sleeves ending at the elbow.  Based solely on her clothes, I’d place this photo somewhere between 1910-1913.

Another little fun thing about this photo is the fingerprint to the right side of the image.  Perhaps the photographer accidentally touched the photo too soon after developing?

Happy spring, everyone!

 

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Filed under 1910s

Photographs of the photographer

I’ve always been fascinated by photographs that photograph the photographer.  Back in the day, this was no easy task, as the camera itself needed to be set up, and the lighting and timing figured out, not to mention having to set up two cameras.  I  found the one below of a female photographer in her driving outfit on Pinterest.

driving outfit and camera

 

This one is extremely fascinating to me, not only because it’s a woman, but because of the handheld style camera.  The focus is on the camera, not the girl, as her eyes behind slightly blurred, and the rest of her facial features hidden.  I wonder if she herself is the photographer, or the photographer’s girlfriend, wife, assistant, etc.

Another draw for me is her outfit.  Her early duster coat has the perfect amount of femininity, unlike other early dusters which were not pinched in at the waist, but free flowing and a dull brown color.  Not only is hers pinched, but it’s striped!  The veil style webbing that surrounds the face while driving is piled high on her hat, making me wonder if she or she and the other photographer had been out and walking around for a while before this photo.  If it was an impromptu sort of photo, her veil would down and surrounding her face.  Another thing I love are her gloves.  I think they’re leather, as I’m unsure of what other material they  might have been made of in the early 19teens.  They’re extremely tight fitting, and show her nail beds as she delicately cups the camera.

On the flipside, it’s always fun to try and think of what the one in the image is photographing, and how that image would have been perceived.

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Filed under 1910s, Photograph

Cat-tastic Tuesday

cats

I’m loving how this little kitty stands out against the drab colors of the girls outfit and background.  If only my kitties would pose this pretty when being photographed!  Based on the leg-of-mutton sleeves, this photograph is from the 1890s.

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March 4, 2014 · 7:30 am