The Lives of Victorian Writers Told in Limericks

Happy Friday! Here’s some crazy limericks from Edward Lear’s 1846 Book of Nonsense.

Interesting Literature

The literary lives of twelve famous Victorians, told in the poetic form they knew so well

Nobody knows for sure why limericks are named limericks. They’re obviously named in honour of Limerick, the city in Ireland, but beyond that nothing is known for certain about why a five-line comic poem should be so named. But the limerick is probably the most recognisable poetic Book of Nonsense Coverform: ask people to name the usual number of lines in a sonnet or villanelle, and you’ll doubtless find some who are in the know, but many will be unable to say for sure. Conversely, it is almost universally known that a limerick is five lines long, with the first, second, and fifth lines usually rhyming (and, to complement this, the third and fourth lines).

As limericks were such a favourite literary pastime of the Victorians – as attested by the popularity of Edward Lear’s limericks in…

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