A game of 20 questions

This week’s letter from Clarese to Chuck is all about the questions.  I wonder if he actually took the time to answer them all!  I did add one comment in red about halfway down.  Enjoy!

March 7, 1946

Thursday noon

 

Dearest Chuck!

Miss me? Like me?  Well me too.  Better than that.  I got a wonderful letter from you today. And I miss you terribly too.  And it doesn’t hurt to say it I guess.  At least we know we miss each other.

I’m so glad you’re home now.  Bet you really had a time going through your room again and re-arranging it.  How many days did it take you? But I know it was fun-bet you found things you had completely forgotten about.  What do your clothes look like?  Your suits-especially your new coat and suit?  Did you really have quite a time finding any clothes?  I still would love to see you in a salt and pepper suit.

How long did you take to get the rod fixed again?  Were you on your way the next morning?  Bet you won’t ever get to bring a car out here.  Not if it broke down just going to Kansas. What did your folks say when they had waited in Wichita so long for you?  Bet they were so happy they didn’t care.  I saw Mr. Shiepe yesterday and he said he bet your dad really blew up.  Did he?

Did you really have a good time visiting on the way home? Was Carl just like he used to be?  Where did you go dancing Sunday evening-any place I know of?

Do you still love the house as much as you did? Do you have a room by yourself or will you have to share it with Lewis?

Say what do they call you?  Is it Charles or Chuck?  I do hope it’s the latter. Have they said very much about me yet?  Did you Grandmother ask why I wasn’t Syrian and do they know much about me?

Darling, do you mind if I don’t write letters airmail?  It may take a while for them to get going, but there’s not much use in doing it for two years. (Here the pen color changes from blue to brown) And pardon me for changing inks.  I’m in class and its very boring.  All about child nursing.

Well, have you as yet been able to see the principle of the school?  Are your folks in favor of you returning to school?  I do hope so honey.  What do you think- I mean they think-about going back to college?  Have you gone down to work yet?  Did your dad seem awfully happy to have you helping him?

Let’s see-guess I haven’t written since Tuesday.  I got to sleep Tuesday nite.  I didn’t rest too well cause I was used to sleeping days.  I really don’t mind floor duty at all now.  I usually get off about 7:30 every morning.  So far I’ve been able to go to sleep every morning.  Have been awfully lucky about not having class till 1-

Yesterday I took my clothes down town to mom.  We ate a good salad in the middle of the afternoon then I went to the show ‘The Fleets In’ and ‘Standing Room Only.’  I know they’re old shows but I wanted to see them anyway. (By the way, if you like older movies, they both look hilarious!)

 

'The Fleet's In,'

‘The Fleet’s In,’ featuring Dorothy Lamour and William Holden, 1942.

 

1944 Standing Room Only 8

‘Standing Room Only,’ starring Paulette Goddard and Fred MacMurry, 1944.

 

I certainly had a headache when I got out.  Guess I’m used to having somebody with me.  And by golly I sure missed you.

You know if I keep averaging 60 hours a week, I’ll have about an extra week off coming for this month alone.  Well-we’re staring another which I have to pay more attention to so I’ll close now and write again soon.

Write to me soon darling. You know I’m almost sure I love you oh so much.  You didn’t think I did when you left, did you? But I’m almost sure now.  Oh I miss you so and am waiting for you to come back to me.

All my love

Clarese

 

Further Reading:

Arnold, Jeremy.  ‘The Fleet’s In.’ Turner Classic Movies. 2013. Web. 12 August 2013 http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/253207|0/The-Fleet-s-In.html

Miss Melissa.  ‘Favorite Screwball Comedies.’ Screwball Comedy. Blogger. 12 July 2011. Image. 12 August 2013 http://screwball-comedy.blogspot.com/2011_07_01_archive.html

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